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On their best album, this fascinating “philosophy jam band” begins with indie rock touchstones and then explores the fringes of those ideas.
Author: Ian Cohen
Posted: October 20, 2018, 5:00 am
On her second album, the Austin singer-songwriter strengthens her voice and broadens her perspective, turning her gaze from romance to a more nuanced view of her own anxieties.
Author: Vrinda Jagota
Posted: October 20, 2018, 5:00 am
Bowie was never more popular during this period, one he looked back on with guilt and bile. But Loving the Alien offers a reset for listeners—to hear these albums fresh, liberated from their composer’s dismissive opinions.
Author: Chris O’Leary
Posted: October 20, 2018, 5:00 am
In the hands of the master violist, this famous stretch of Bach’s music become body music, rooted in breath and wood and muscle.
Author: Jayson Greene
Posted: October 20, 2018, 5:00 am
Collecting the sometimes-dismissed output of these pioneers between their masterpiece and their breakup, this box set sheds welcome light on how relevant many of these songs remain.
Author: Jesse Dorris
Posted: October 19, 2018, 5:00 am
The latest EP from the versatile young singer is a harmless taste of pop-inflected R&B, a style in which Khalid sounds largely unremarkable.
Author: Alphonse Pierre
Posted: October 19, 2018, 5:00 am
With help from the Black Keys’ Patrick Carney and erstwhile pop star Michelle Branch, the DIY icon finds new ways to tease out light and dark, allure and anxiety with his key-ignoring baritone.
Author: Marc Masters
Posted: October 19, 2018, 5:00 am
Jaded, nihilistic, and heavy: Dylan Baldi leads his band into one of the most self-immolating and intense albums of his career.
Author: Evan Rytlewski
Posted: October 19, 2018, 5:00 am
Joined by his Imposters in the studio for the first time in a decade, the silver-tongued songwriter turns tunes from abandoned musicals into a surprisingly cohesive record.
Author: Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Posted: October 18, 2018, 5:00 am
The latest from experimental musician David Tibet is an arduous but rewarding album, the feeling of listening to a preacher behind the pulpit, or a doomsayer on the soapbox.
Author: Calum Marsh
Posted: October 18, 2018, 5:00 am
The proper, widescreen debut from Quavo is filled with passable, professional songs that pale when compared to nearly any full-length Migos record.
Author: Paul A. Thompson
Posted: October 18, 2018, 5:00 am
Usher and Zaytoven’s “collaborative project“ is a solid homage to the duo’s beloved Atlanta roots and the city’s sound that has permeated just about every corner of popular music.
Author: Briana Younger
Posted: October 18, 2018, 5:00 am
Though he recruits Tegan and Sara and a member of Protomartyr here, the producer’s voice emerges as the real star of these darkly funny, magnetic songs.
Author: Philip Sherburne
Posted: October 17, 2018, 5:00 am
After their longest break in a decade, the acoustic-and-drums duo return with hopes of reorienting their singular sound through the help of more electronics.
Author: Ian Cohen
Posted: October 17, 2018, 5:00 am
The All Dogs leader adds a rock band behind much of her second solo album, but she somehow sounds more alone on those songs than on the record’s unflinching acoustic tunes.
Author: Sasha Geffen
Posted: October 17, 2018, 5:00 am
The D.C. native takes a chip on his shoulder into the catchiest music of his career. In every Glizzy rap boast, you can hear in his voice all that was sacrificed to achieve it.
Author: Sheldon Pearce
Posted: October 17, 2018, 5:00 am
Working remotely in Los Angeles and Brisbane, these two ambient mainstays toe the line for an album that exists in a perpetual state of becoming something else.
Author: Brian Howe
Posted: October 16, 2018, 5:00 am
On their sophomore album, the London trio animate songs about the complexity of memory and the promise of dreams with playful production choices and moments of bedlam.
Author: Margaret Farrell
Posted: October 16, 2018, 5:00 am
With barely more than her voice and a piano, Annie Clark strips her hypersexual, neon-clad 2017 album Masseduction for parts. It is a welcome antidote to a career defined by cult and concept.
Author: Arielle Gordon
Posted: October 16, 2018, 5:00 am
Once again taking up the mantle of the genre and social movement he calls “noirwave,” South Africa’s Yannick Ilunga finds new strength in personal expression and political engagement.
Author: Stephen Kearse
Posted: October 16, 2018, 5:00 am
The Philadelphia band’s seventh album draws from fiction, the history of international warfare, and their own internal rosary of images to create a dense, literary tangle of post-hardcore.
Author: Brad Nelson
Posted: October 15, 2018, 5:00 am
The perfectly fine debut from the London R&B singer offers a grip of retro, snappy jams without sounding like a pastiche.
Author: Owen Myers
Posted: October 15, 2018, 5:00 am
With his husky, sensitive baritone, this son of Canada’s Prairie Provinces mixes the tales of modern and historic wanderers on his second sterling album of traditional folk and country.
Author: Amanda Wicks
Posted: October 15, 2018, 5:00 am
The eccentric New Zealand singer-songwriter turns his skewed pop sensibilities toward soundtracking a five-part melodrama of his own making; it’s intermittently gorgeous but frustratingly foggy.
Author: Andy Beta
Posted: October 15, 2018, 5:00 am
Each Sunday, Pitchfork takes an in-depth look at a significant album from the past, and any record not in our archives is eligible. Today, we revisit the debut from the B-52s, a bastion of provocative post-punk unlike anything else.
Author: Susan Elizabeth Shepard
Posted: October 14, 2018, 5:00 am
Frederikke Hoffmeier’s voice is the thread that holds together her apocalyptic mood pieces, a cinematic take on noise that’s driven by dead-eyed focus.
Author: Daniel Martin-McCormick
Posted: October 13, 2018, 5:00 am
A year after headlining a night of the tragic Route 91 Harvest festival, the popular country renegade forgoes the obvious references on one of the most modest but poignant albums of his career.
Author: Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Posted: October 13, 2018, 5:00 am
Joining the Mivos Quartet’s strings with rapper Kool A.D. and a traditional jazz ensemble, the Oakland trumpeter crafts suite-like compositions that grapple with structural racism and state violence.
Author: Seth Colter Walls
Posted: October 13, 2018, 5:00 am
On her second solo record, Gabrielle Herbst relishes pushing her voice to its limit.
Author: Sasha Geffen
Posted: October 13, 2018, 5:00 am
The latest album from the Big Thief singer evokes a singular, solitary chill. With a great imagination for melody, Lenker conjures a world of mingled trauma and love.
Author: Jayson Greene
Posted: October 12, 2018, 5:00 am

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